Sunday, July 20, 2008

Borrowing the pulpit from Nicole

My friends and family in the medical field can just skip right on over this post...

For those of you who don't know my stand on vaccinations, let me give you the abridged version. I realize the tremendous need for routine vaccinations - obviously millions of people would die without them. My problem with the vaccines is the way in which they are administered and the number of vaccines that are given - seriously, since when do we really need a Chicken Pox vaccine? Regardless of what the FDA states, combining vaccines is dangerous and any parent who has sat up all night with an infant who spiked a 104 fever after receiving a vaccine knows the fear that runs through your veins. The statistics are overwhelming and with the rise of Autism and other developmental disabilities that our children are facing, it is sickening. 1 in 150 children have Autism, with white males being the most at risk. Have you sat back and taken a good long look at our children? I remember when I was growing up; there were very few children with any kind of disability. My whole point, educate yourself - give informed consent. Before you take your infant or toddler in to be vaccinated, do your homework. The statistics are alarming!!! I do NOT allow Addie to get more than one vaccine at a time. This was a battle that I fought with Dr. Dudgeon in the beginning, but won last summer. I will choose what vaccines Addie receives and I wish I had been more educated on this subject when Julien was a baby. What started my little ramblings this time??? The FDA approved a new vaccine June 2008, it is the Pentacel vaccine and I cannot believe the combination:

Pentacel, [Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Adsorbed, Inactivated Poliovirus and Haemophilus b Conjugate (Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate) Vaccine] (DTaP-IPV/Hib) is a vaccine for intramuscular injection. It consists of a Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Adsorbed and Inactivated Poliovirus (DTaP-IPV) component and an ActHIB® vaccine component. ActHIB vaccine (Haemophilus b Conjugate Vaccine [Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate]), consists of Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate [PRP]) covalently bound to tetanus toxoid (PRP-T). The DTaP-IPV component is supplied as a sterile liquid used to reconstitute the lyophilized ActHIB vaccine component to form Pentacel vaccine.

You got all that? I hope you do before you allow it to be injected into your child. It is not required that vaccines be combined. You can request vaccines to be given separate and at any length of time apart, preferably at least four weeks and never when your child is sick. I don't like to preach often, but just be more informed...it's your childs life!

After thought...obviously, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, which is great because this is my blog and I get to say what I want to. Of course every child is different and one way doesn't work for everyone - my friend who has a child with Autism would very much agree with me, whereas someone who has never had a child with any kind of disability would never think twice about giving this vaccine. If this post saves just one child or enables a parent to make a more informed decision, then it has served its purpose.

2 comments:

Nicole said...

Preach it Sista Jenn!!!

Anonymous said...

I had the same thoughts about the chicken pox vaccine, until my friend's son had a horrible case of them and almost died. This was many years ago, when the vaccine wasn't widely available. He spent a week in the hospital and had many scars.

I've looked at the same issues, as my son is only four months younger than Addie. We've been lucky in that he's not had any reaction to any of the vaccines, other than some soreness at the injection site. For us, it works better to use the combined vaccines and reduce the number of needle sticks he has to put up with. But, I think that you're doing what is best for your child by splitting them up, and should be able to do so without having to fight for it. Each child is different in the way that they develop and how their bodies react to the vaccines and there's not necessarily a best way that works for everyone.